2014 Fair Raffle Prize is a Beautiful Hooked Rug

2014 Raffle!

AT THE FAIR
10am-5pm, Oct. 3-5
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2014 Hooked rug raffle prize

2014 Hooked rug raffle prize

For our 71st Fair, the raffle ticket winner will take home a beautiful hooked wool rug generously donated by long time Fair demonstrator Nancy Blair of Tomorrow’s Heirlooms.

And it is beautiful. This 37- by 67-inch traditional hooked rug, constructed using hand-dyed and felted wool fabric, is vibrant with color, and its intricate and beautifully executed design will make any floor it lands upon after the Fair feel very lucky indeed.

Tickets are $3 each or four for $10. You may purchase tickets and see the rug in the Corner Store Shop, 40183 Main Street in Waterford (open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday), or during the Fair.

The winning ticket will  be drawn Sunday afternoon of the Fair, October 5. You need not be present to win.

We thank Ms. Blair for this generous donation. Proceeds from the raffle support the mission of the Waterford Foundation.

Many heritage crafts are demonstrated at the Fair; below is a brief history of this one.

Hooked rugs began to appear in America and Canada by the mid-1900s.  They were constructed from material that was readily available to the homemaker, with patterns that were whimsical, using her imagination to create warm, colorful floor coverings for otherwise cold bare floors. Unlike today’s rug hookers, the makers of antique hooked rugs did not concern themselves with carefully laid out designs with complementary colors. Instead, most rugs had a visual surprise in unexpected use of a bright color within a palette of more muted tones. Backgrounds often were of one color but in a corner or border, there would be something entirely different. Older rugs were not predominately made from wool as most are today but of a blend of whatever was available. Cotton night shirts, petticoats with lace still attached, ribbon, blankets and old shawls would be used and dyed naturally if another color was needed.